Resuscitation Guidelines 2015

Resuscitation Guidelines 2015

Resuscitation Guidelines 2015

On the 15th of October The Resuscitation Council (UK) published new resuscitation guidelines. The good news is very little has changed, so you don’t have to worry about learning lot’s of new ratios, numbers and techniques. The 2015 Guidelines do provide a bit more clarification on some techniques.

Full details of the new guidelines can be found by heading over to The Resuscitation Council (UK) website.

 

 

Summary of Changes

  • Once again emphasis is being placed on the use of AEDs, whether that is though Public Access units (PAD) or on-site. We always ensure that simple AED use is included in all our CPR training. While you don’t need a qualification to sue one, completing a training programme such as our Level 2 Award in Basic Life Support and Safe Use of an Automated External Defibrillator is a much better way to ensure you are fully prepared. We would always recommend completing training if you have an on-site AED. Did you know we can also supply AED units, spares and accessories?
  • The 2015 resuscitation guidelines also place emphasis on minimum disruption to the CPR process, especially in delays during chest compressions. It is recommended that chest compressions are interrupted for no more than 10 seconds to perform breaths or attached an AED.
  • The recommendation is also to swap with another person (if someone is available) every 2 mins to ensure quality chest compressions are maintained throughout the resuscitation attempt.
  • Guidelines are compression numbers (30) and ratios (30 compressions : 2 ventilations) remain the same, along with the rate (100 – 120 per minute) and depth (at least 5cm, no more than 6cm on an adult). If you last First Aid traininer told you that you don’t do ventilations anymore then your last trainer was wrong. However, the guidlines that if you are unwilling or unable to do ventilations then you can do hands only or compression only CPR still remains.
  • Further guidance has now been giving on the depth of chest compressions for infants and children. While the recommendation of 1/3 of the chest depth still remains, The Resuscitation Council (UK) have clarified that it should be approximately 4cm for an infant and 5cm for a child.
  • Further clarification has also been brought into the guidelines for ventilation durations. The paediatric guidelines are now the same as for adults, which recommends that each breath should take no more than 1 second to complete. This gives a short sharp breath rather than a long slow breath. Remember we don’t want to interrupt chest compressions for more than 10 seconds.
  • The guidelines now also recommend that if an unknown casualty (i.e. no one is with the casualty who can tell you if they suffer from regular seizures) is suffering a seizure then the first aider should be suspicious of cardiac arrest and carefully assess whether the casualty is breathing normally.
  • The guidelines also now no longer recommend the use of finger sweeps or jaw thrusts for lay person first aiders.

You can read the full guidelines on The Resuscitation Council (UK) website.